The investigations at Grenfell Tower have led police to believe the “number of people missing, but as yet unaccounted for” has risen from 58, the Metropolitan Police said.

Releasing the first images from inside the burnt-out building, Commander Stuart Cundy said some of the victims may never be identified.

He said: “The conditions due to the fire damage verge on indescribable, which is why this will be such a lengthy operation taking weeks to complete.

“We must also prepare people for the terrible reality that some people may not be identified due to the intensity of the fire.”

Mr Cundy added: “Sadly that work leads me to believe that the number of people missing, but as yet unaccounted for has risen from yesterday’s figure of 58.”

Commander Stuart Cundy
Commander Stuart Cundy (Dominic Lipinski/PA)

Releasing a tranche of footage showing the aftermath of the blaze, Mr Cundy said: “Today, police teams continue their support to families, and make enquiries to cross check the number of those missing.

“I have always said I will be accurate about what I know, so the next figure of those presumed dead and missing will be released tomorrow, Monday 19 June. The figure will be higher but I do not wish to speculate on that number today.”

The news came as the Government announced those left homeless by the fire will be given at least £5,500 from an emergency fund.

Residents will be given £500 in cash followed by a bank payment for the rest from Monday and will come from the £5 million fund announced by Theresa May on Friday.

The Prime Minister insisted the Government was doing everything possible to help those caught up in the tragedy.

Residents who met Mrs May in Downing Street over the weekend said while they welcomed the funding they had not been consulted before the announcement was made.

They said: “We naturally welcome funds for those in need, though this does show once more the tendency to sideline residents’ views.

“At No 10 yesterday, the Prime Minister assured the group that from now on residents would be consulted on a coordinated relief effort. This has not happened with these funds.”

The move came as the official response to the crisis drew fresh condemnation from residents and London Mayor Sadiq Khan.

In a statement to the Press Association, residents criticised Kensington and Chelsea Tenant Management Organisation for its reaction to the disaster.

Burnt-out lifts at Grenfell Tower in west London
Burnt-out lifts at Grenfell Tower (Metropolitan Police/PA)

The group said: “In our meeting at Downing Street, we explained to the Prime Minister the anger of all residents towards the management of the estate over a long period of time, paving the way to this tragedy.

“With the exception of very few junior officers, the estate managers have been invisible in the aftermath of the tragedy.”

Mr Khan said the local community was “frustrated” and “angry” in the wake of the blaze after he attended a church service near the tower block in west London.

His remarks came as Nick Paget-Brown, the Tory leader of Kensington and Chelsea council, insisted officials were on the ground “very soon” after the fire broke out following criticism from Mrs May, who said the support given to residents was “not good enough”.